Sysadmins of the North

Technical blog, where topics include: computer, server, web, sysadmin, MySQL, database, virtualization, optimization and security

Search results: "https" (page 1 of 17)

SSL in WordPress: how to move WordPress to HTTPS? The definitive guide

Having an SSL certificate in your WordPress is the de-facto standard nowadays, did you know that? Google ranks sites having HTTPS higher in their SERP. But in WordPress, how do you configure an SSL certificate and HTTPS URL? You’ll learn the important steps to move WordPress from http to https in this post.

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Ghost on IIS with HTTPS, how to resolve a “Too many redirects” error

When you use iisnode to host the Node.js blogging software Ghost on your IIS web server, and you set up an SSL certificate for your Ghost website, you may run into too many redirect issues when changing Ghost’s config.js file. This happend to me yesterday, and here is the solution.

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Load Transposh Translation Filter over HTTPS

Transposh Translation Filter is the translation filter for WordPress, Transposh helps you multi-lingualize your blog with ease by translating your posts automagically. Unfortunately, Transposh plugin doesn’t load over HTTPS, which is easy to fix…

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How to redirect HTTP to HTTPS on IIS

An HTTP to HTTPS redirect on IIS is often better left to the web server, with a simple httpRedirect redirection, than to a resource expensive URL Rewrite. Where possible, use the IIS httpRedirect element for IIS HTTP to HTTPS redirection, and here is how:

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Redirect HTTP to HTTPS on Apache 2.4

A permanent redirect in Apache using status code 301

The last few day’s I’ve been toying with Nagios, setting up a monitoring system. An Apache redirect to HTTPS was one of the tasks I wanted to accomplish. This would redirect the Nagios vhost from HTTP to HTTPS using an Apache 2.4.6 VirtualHost, and no resource expensive rewrite would be necessary.

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Install Windows Server Servicing Stack Updates (SSU) using PowerShell

You can install Servicing Stack Updates (SSU) for Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019 using PowerShell, without downtime. Because they must be installed prior to your normal Windows Server security updates, you can install them anytime you want to during the day. Here’s a small PowerShell example to do so.

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Security baseline for Windows 10 v1903 and Windows Server v1903 – final release

Microsoft is pleased to announce the final release of the security configuration baseline settings for Windows 10 version 1903 (a.k.a., “19H1”), and for Windows Server version 1903.

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Automatically flush Redis cache after publishing a WordPress post

In a previous post I explained that clearing PHP opcode caches before WordPress Updates helps in streamlining the update process. WordPress updates no longer fail because of cached file locations. Did you know you can automatically flush opcode caches like Redis when you publishing a post or page in WordPress? Doing so ensures you and your visitors see the newly created content immediately.

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Setting up Monit monitoring in Windows Subsystem for Linux WSL

A couple of years ago, I wrote a blog article about setting up Monit monitoring on an Ubuntu VM on Hyper-V. Now it’s time to do the same, but then in Windows Subsystem for Linux, or WSL. So, without further ado, here is how to install and configure Monit monitoring in Windows 10 WSL.

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How to verify SMBv1 is disabled in Windows and Windows Server

Since WannaCry and Petya ransomware were spreading through Windows systems in 2017, it’s recommended to have Server Message Block (SMB) version 1 disabled in Windows clients and Windows Server. Now SMBv1 is not installed by default in Windows 10 1709 and Windows Server, version 1709 and later, but how can you be sure it is disabled in older versions of Windows? Easy: PowerShell.

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Privacy Policy

Who we are

Our website address is: https://www.saotn.org.

What personal data we collect and why we collect it

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.

An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Contact forms

Cookies

If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year.

If you have an account and you log in to this site, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser.

When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select “Remember Me”, your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed.

If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.

These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Analytics

Who we share your data with

How long we retain your data

If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue.

For users that register on our website (if any), we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.

Your contact information

Additional information

How we protect your data

What data breach procedures we have in place

What third parties we receive data from

What automated decision making and/or profiling we do with user data

Industry regulatory disclosure requirements

How to uninstall and remove Adobe Flash Player in Windows Server

Ever wondered why Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) offers Flash updates for Windows Server? Adobe Flash Player is installed on Windows Server 2016 / 2019 if you have the Remote Desktop Session Host (RDSH) role installed. Yikes! I can imagine you want to delete Adobe Flash Player without deleting the RDSH role, and here is how.

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HTTP/3

Daniel Stenberg writes on daniel.haxx.se blog

HTTP/3 is the coming new HTTP version that uses QUIC for transport! That’s an interesting development to follow, HTTP(S) over UDP and how that’ll go with (small) office and home equipment hardware, IOT, middleware

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11+ Tips to optimize Umbraco CMS

Umbraco is a popular, ASP.NET powered, content management system (CMS). Even though it performs pretty well, here are 11+ tips to optimize the performance of Umbraco powered websites on IIS.

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WordPress .htaccess security best practices in Apache 2.4.6+

Apache Access Control done right, ‘Allow/Deny from all’ versus ‘Require All Granted/Denied’

Since Apache 2.4.6, a new module is used to configure and set up access control for websites: mod_authz_core. This means you have to use a different syntax for allowing or blocking hosts and IP addresses to your website. But unfortunately, old documentation is never updated and people even still write blog posts using that old syntax, leaving you with an unprotected website. Not what you had in mind, now is it?…

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