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PowerShell

PowerShell scripting and code snippets, examples and info for Windows Server administrators. Might contain some AppCmd and DISM as well.

PowerShell Get-FsrmQuota and Set-FsrmQuota

To get and set File Server Resource Manager NTFS quota, you now have to use PowerShell‘s FileServerResourceManager cmdlets. In the past, I used to get and set NTFS directory quota with the dirquota command, which is deprecated. A behavioral change for me (and you?) I can live with: it’s pretty easy to get directory information with Get-FsrmQuota and change dirquota using Set-FsrmQuota.

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Set IIS Application Pool recycle defaults to Specific Times, not Regular Time Interval

By default, an IIS application pool (or “AppPool”) recycles on a regular time interval of 1740 minutes, or 29 hours. One reason for this time interval is that application pools don’t recycle at the same moment every day (every day at 07.00 for example). However, sometimes you want to change this regular time interval to a specific time schedule. And when you try to configure this in IIS Manager, it gives you an error. Luckily, AppCmd and PowerShell come to the rescue!

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PowerShell: find all files owned by a particular user

Find all files from one owner in Windows using PowerShell

In Windows, you sometimes need to find all files owned by a specific user. Recursively on your Windows Server NTFS file system. PowerShell has some nice cmdlets and features to automate this task for you. Here you’ll find example PowerShell scripts to find and list files owned by a specific user…

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Add websites and application pools to IIS with PowerShell, in a for loop

How to use PowerShell to create websites and application pools in IIS… A client of the company I work for wanted to quickly add 60 sub-domains to his website. But, the sub-domains had to be created as self contained IIS websites, and running in their own application pools. Luckily, the client wanted 60 consecutive sub-domain names, e.g. “sub01.example.com”, “sub02.example.com”, …, … up till “sub60.example.com”. This made our task a bit easier, because we could easily script this in PowerShell

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