The following PHP code fix goes for nearly all PHP Call-time pass-by-reference errors:

The WordPress plugin In Over Your Archives is a plugin to display your archive page in a nice way, just like on inoveryourhead.net. The plugin hasn’t been updated in quite some time and breaks with PHP version 5.4:
Continue reading

If you run a WordPress blog where you display (parts of) source code, syntax highlighting is a must! It prettifies the code which makes it easier to read and it distinguishes code from text. However, most syntax highlighting is made available through plugins, and we all know too many plugins bring a lot of overhead to your blog.

Too many plugins and much overhead results in a slower blog. We don’t want a slow blog, so here is how to fix that.
Continue reading

Information about HeartBleed and IIS

Via Erez’s IIS Blog:

The Heartbleed vulnerability in OpenSSL (CVE-2014-0160) has received a significant amount of attention recently. While the discovered issue is specific to OpenSSL, many customers are wondering whether this affects Microsoft’s offerings, specifically Windows and IIS. Microsoft Account and Microsoft Azure, along with most Microsoft Services, were not impacted by the OpenSSL vulnerability. Windows’ implementation of SSL/TLS was also not impacted.

We also want to assure our customers that default configurations of Windows do not include OpenSSL, and are not impacted by this vulnerability. Windows comes with its own encryption component called Secure Channel (a.k.a. SChannel), which is not susceptible to the Heartbleed vulnerability.

Read more on Erez’s IIS Blog

For more information and corrective action guidance, see the information from US Cert: Vulnerability Note VU#720951: OpenSSL heartbeat extension read overflow discloses sensitive information.

WordPress 3.8.2 Security Release

WordPress 3.8.2 is now available. This is an important security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

This releases fixes a weakness that could let an attacker force their way into your site by forging authentication cookies. This was discovered and fixed by Jon Cave of the WordPress security team.
Continue reading